EUMOPS PEROTIS PDF

The western bonneted bat Eumops perotis , also known as the Greater mastiff bat and the Western mastiff bat, is the largest bat in North America. Its wings are distinctively long but narrow, which does not allow much maneuverability around objects. It is a free-tailed bat that has large feet, and the pelage is short and velvety. The upper parts are brown to grayish brown with bases of the hairs being whitish, the under parts of the bat are paler.

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The western bonneted bat Eumops perotis , also known as the Greater mastiff bat and the Western mastiff bat, is the largest bat in North America. Its wings are distinctively long but narrow, which does not allow much maneuverability around objects. It is a free-tailed bat that has large feet, and the pelage is short and velvety. The upper parts are brown to grayish brown with bases of the hairs being whitish, the under parts of the bat are paler.

It has large ears that are connected across the forehead and protrude beyond the tip of the snout by 10 mm. Males have a peculiar glandular pouch on their throat which produces an odoriferous secretion, in females this gland is not as developed.

The external measurements average: total length mm, tail length 57 mm, foot 17 mm, ear 40 mm, and forearm 76 mm Chebes Eumops perotis has a rather disjunctive distribution. The subspecies E. The species is found in a variety of habitats which include desert scrub, chaparral, or oak woodland, however they prefer habitats where there are significant rock features offering suitable roosting sites Best et al Eumops perotis mates in early spring and the gestation period is approximately days.

Young are typically born in June or July and a nursery may contain young ranging from newborn individuals to ones that are already several weeks old. The parturition dates vary more for these bats then any other bat in the United States. Normally one young is produced per year, but occasionally a female may give birth to twins. Young are a dull black color at birth. Observation has indicated that males and females remain together throughout the year Best et al Eumops perotis prefers rugged rocky canyons and cliffs where they can find roost sites in crevices, choosing long vertical slits at least 2 inches 50 mm wide, from which they climb rapidly to a narrower spot and wedge themselves in.

These crevices generally face downward so they can be entered from below. These bats can not take off from a flat surface on there own, so an unobstructed drop of several meters is required so that the emerging bats can gain sufficient momentum to become airborne. Colony size varies from two or three bats to several dozen, but generally never more than one hundred. These bats leave their day roosts late in the evening to forage.

This species produces a high-pitched call that can be heard when they are flying up to meters feet above ground. This call can often be heard in the evening when bats are getting ready to leave their day roost to feed Cox Since these bats can not take off from the ground these insects must be taken off canyon walls.

These bats do not use night roosts but instead sore at high altitudes all night long in order to feed over wide areas. Insects that have been carried up by thermal currents are thought to make up a large part of their diet Chebes Since these bats make rather loud calls that can be easily heard, experts can use these calls to monitor the population size. In the southwest there has been a decline in calls which has showed a rather large decrease in the population size over the past 30 years Chebes The loss of large open water drinking areas seems to be a major threat to the species.

Also destroying or disturbing key cliff habitat by building impoundments or quarry operations has caused a decrease in the population. Foraging may also be affected by pesticide application in agricultural areas Best et al Chebes, L.

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Eumops perotis

Pronunciation: you -mops per- oh -tis. The greater bonneted bat is the largest bat in the U. It is found in California, Nevada, Arizona, Texas and Mexico though it is rarely encountered in large numbers. Almost nothing is known about the behavior or status of western mastiff bats. Because they roost in cliff-face crevices and feed high above the ground, they are rarely seen and approach the ground only at a few select drinking sites. This bat is severely limited by available drinking water. Its long, narrow wings preclude it from drinking at ponds less than feet long.

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Western mastiff bat

The distribution of the western mastiff bat is patchy. It can be found from the coast of the southwestern United States into central Mexico and southeast to Cuba. The northern limit of its range is the southern half of California. In the United States it extends southeast into western Texas through southern Nevada and southwestern Arizona.

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Species Profiles

The western mastiff bat Eumops perotis , also known as the western bonneted bat , the greater mastiff bat , or the greater bonneted bat , is a member of the free-tailed bat family, Molossidae. The subspecies Eumops perotis californicus is a species of concern as identified by the U. Fish and Wildlife Service. The range of this subspecies is principally southwest desert regions of the United States, along the border with Mexico; however, the range extends as far north on the Pacific coast to Alameda County , California. The western mastiff bat has a body length of 5.

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Western Mastiff Bat Eumops perotis Protection Status Notes Since western mastiff bats produce piercingly loud calls that can easily be heard, experts can use these to assess status trends. They report an alarming loss of these bats' magical sounds over the Southwest over the past 30 years. While little specific information is available on population trends in Texas, severe declines have been documented in the Los Angeles basin in California, where it is considered a Species of Special Concern. Description Eumops perotis can be distinguished from all other North American molossid free-tail species based on size. Life History Although maternity roosts for many bat species contain only adult females and their young, some E. Unlike vespertilionids which mate in the fall, North American molossids, including E.

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